Build a Landing Page

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Ut elit tellus, luctus nec ullamcorper mattis, pulvinar dapibus leo.

Build a Landing Page

Once you’ve clarified your idea, it’s time to create your minimum viable product.

To start, you’ll need to create a couple landing pages and install google analytics (or use the analytics tool built into your landing page builder) to monitor traffic and button clicks.

On the first landing page describe your product as if it’s already available by listing the basic details of how it works, some of the features you’ll be offering, and provide a call to action leading to a product or pricing page.

Use the simplified description of your idea that COO Email List you created in step one as a starting point for your headline and your general description.

Take a look at Buffer’s page below

COO Email List

They took their main benefit – “allow people to schedule Tweets in advance” – and condensed it into a headline that said “Tweet more consistently with buffer.” They then explain how their product works in bullet points leading to their plans and pricing page.

How You Can Use Landing Pages to Validate Your Product Idea
Here’s what Buffer’s second page looked like:

How You Can Use Landing Pages

to Validate Your Product Idea
This page gives specific details about what a user is going to be buying, in Buffer’s case different packages of their social media scheduling software.

If you have a physical product, this page could include

physical specifications of the product, some different colors that might be available, and possibly even shipping details.

Here’s an example of what a product page could look like for a physical item:

How You Can Use Landing Pages to Validate Your Product Idea
The only difference between this page and a real

product page is that when a use clicks to buy, they’ll be brought here:

How You Can Use Landing Pages to Validate Your Product Idea
This is essentially a pre-launch page with a short message explaining that the product is not quite ready. It gives users the opportunity to enter their email to

find out more about the product once it’s ready to go.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.